Tunes for Cruisin’ Playlist

September 20, 2012

We are in the car more than you think:

At an nationwide average drive-time of about 24.3 minutes, Americans now spend more than 100 hours a year commuting to work, according to the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey. So crank up the tunes and enjoy the ride!

Little Red Corvette/ Prince

Inspiration for the song hit as the musician napped in a pink Edsel, Prince notched his first Top Ten entry with one of the most sensual and frankly explicit hits ever to crack the charts. “Little Red Corvette,” a slow-burning funk-pop odyssey which is most definitely not about a sports car, is an after-dark masterpiece, aural soft porn rendered with the inextricable combination of perversity and sophistication which defines virtually all of his best work. Everything about the song is suggestive, from its moaning synthesizers to its bump-and-grind rhythm to the orgasmic squeals which punctuate Prince’s vocals; even the lyrical metaphors are so persuasive — in addition to cars, there are horses (Trojans, in fact, some of ’em used) — that it’s virtually impossible to discuss “Little Red Corvette” without lapsing into double entendres of one’s own. (Really, how else to describe the incendiary coda which closes the song but as a climax?) Making a brilliant case for innuendo as an end unto itself, “Little Red Corvette”‘s triumph is that even while the song — much like the body of its lusty heroine — is “just on the verge of being obscene,” it never succumbs to blatant tastelessness; even as an evocation of pure sexuality, it appeals to the imagination as much as the libido. Not just Prince’s first major hit single, “Little Red Corvette” may be his very best — only fitting that a song about staying power would have so much of its own.- All Music Guide

Mustang Sally/ Wilson Pickett

Wilson Pickett’s interpretation of Sir Mack Rice’s “Mustang Sally” quickly yielded the vocalist a career-defining side that ultimately climbed to the Top Ten R&B chart and into the Top 25 on the pop singles survey in December of 1966. Earlier in the year, Pickett had started working at Fame Recording Studios in Muscle Shoals, AL, instead of the Memphis, TN-based Stax Records facility that had turned out the smashes “In the Midnight Hour,” “Don’t Fight It,” and “634-5789.” His initial outing in Muscle Shoals scored him one of the largest titles of his career, the infectiously fun “Land of 1000 Dances.” For Pickett’s subsequent session, he returned to Alabama to cut what would become the exemplary Wicked Pickett (1966) long-player. “Mustang Sally”‘s bouncy groove instantly developed into the album’s focus track, with the vocalist supported by the Fame house band, whose membership included Chips Moman (guitar), Tommy Cogbill (bass), Roger Hawkins (drums), and Spooner Oldham (piano). Presumably, the horn section was once again supplied by the Stax crew, who had been in attendance for the earlier date as well. Although not as significant a crossover hit as “Land of 1000 Dances” or “In the Midnight Hour,” “Mustang Sally” provides another good example of how complementary the material, artist, and musicians had become. -All Music Guide

Drive my car/ Beatles

“Drive My Car” was one of the best numbers on the Beatles’ Rubber Soul album, one which saw both their musical and lyrical horizons visibly opening. Although John Lennon was in general ahead of Paul McCartney in expanding his lyrics in more ambitious and experimental directions, this story-song was principally the work of McCartney, with some assistance from his contractual songwriting partner. The verse is based around a funky two-chord groove which ascends to a higher level at the very end, a suitable bedrock for a commanding McCartney hard rock vocal. Far more surprising is the chorus, with its tortuous jazzy key changes, a quality reinforced by the bursts of jazz piano that follow the first two lines. While initially the song seems like the standard macho boasting of some guy showing off his car, it transpires that actually the girl in the song is leading the narrator on by half-hinting that she’ll let him be her chauffeur, and maybe be his lover too. That’s a subtle, one might say almost O. Henry-like, slant that was most likely totally beyond the reach of the usual Californian hot-rod act, or most other pop and rock singers for that matter. The most ironic touch, however, was applied when the Beatles merrily sang “beep beep” at the end of the chorus’ punch line: a nifty way of making nonsense words compliment the images and the sounds. An especially wiry guitar solo was a nice cap to the understated, faintly nutty satire of what was nonetheless a very good-natured tune. The best-known cover of “Drive My Car” — not one of Lennon-McCartney’s more frequently interpreted compositions — was by jazz singer Bobby McFerrin in the 1980s.-All Music Guide

Cars/ Gary Numan

A personal road-rage incident inspired the synth-pop hit. Perhaps the most iconic intro of the entire synth-pop era (in 2003, an auto manufacturer set a commercial to the instrumental opening of “Cars,” knowing that its target audience would get the reference immediately), the throbbing, repetitive synths of “Cars” are all most listeners know of Gary Numan, especially in the US, where it was the musician’s only Top 40 hit. Taken in the context of the album The Pleasure Principle, the deliberate isolation of Numan’s lyrics fits in perfectly with Numan’s overarching obsession with alienation and depersonalization. In the context of a four-minute pop single, however, “Cars” is a novelty about on a par with the five-minute edit of Kraftwerk’s “Autobahn” that was a minor hit in 1975; in other words, only about one step above Hot Butter’s “Popcorn.” That said, it was arguably the first true new wave hit single in the United States, and the song’s slightly odd structure (the song proper is over in about 90 seconds, with the rest of its running time devoted entirely to an extremely long fade-out) and crisply modern electronic sound set the stage for the Human League’s “Don’t You Want Me” a couple years later, and the early MTV cavalcade of new wave smashes that followed.-All Music Guide

Little Deuce Coupe/ Beach Boys

The Beach Boys’ biggest hit in the hot rod rock genre found their budding blend of up-tempo pop/rock and sweet vocal harmonies flowering into something truly special. The lyrics of “Little Deuce Coupe,” which Wilson penned with DJ and car enthusiast Roger Christian, are a simple but lovingly detailed ode to “the fastest set of wheels in town” that divide their time between listing this car’s attributes and making boastful asides about its prowess (“If it had a set of wings, man, I know she could fly”). The melody behind this car-crazy narrative utilizes a doo wop-inspired sense of swing to create a song that cruises in jaunty fashion during the verses but soars into the stratosphere on its harmony-drenched chorus. The Beach Boys’ recording enhances the swing of the melody by building its foundation on a combination of boogie-woogie piano riffs and a pulsing bass line that pushes it along in a gentle but insistent fashion. However, the best part of that recording is its vocal arrangement: wordless harmonies add an extra melodic punch to the verses and Mike Love’s bass vocal and Brian Wilson’s falsetto blend in a sublime fashion to drive the chorus home. The mix of clever songwriting and stylish production made “Little Deuce Coupe” a Top 20 hit for the Beach Boys and inspired covers by every hot rod rocker from Jan & Dean to the T-Bones. It also became a seemingly eternal part of the Beach Boys’ live set, proving “Little Deuce Coupe” is more than just another hot rod tune.-All Music Guide

Rocket 88/ Ike Turner

In 1991, after a great deal of debate, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame recognized this as the first Rock and Roll song ever recorded. Turner was in jail at the time for cocaine possession, so his daughter accepted the award. The song is about a car. The Oldsmobile “Rocket 88” came out in 1949 and was the fastest car on the road at the time. A small car with a big, overhead valve V8 engine, it was one of the first muscle cars and dominated NASCAR races in the ’50s. The car was advertised as having a V-8 “Rocket” engine, with the slogan, “Make a Date with a Rocket 88.” This song was produced by Sam Phillips, who formed Sun Records in 1952. Phillips later became famous for recording Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Carl Perkins and Jerry Lee Lewis.-songfacts.com
Black Limousine/ Rolling Stones
This song features one of Mick Jagger’s best harmonica performances. This is based on a song by Blues musician Jimmy Reed called “You Don’t Have To Go.” The song is about The Stones’ Rock and Roll lifestyle of women, alcohol, and limousines. This was first recorded at the Some Girls sessions in 1978. Ron Wood got a writing credit for this. It is one of the few Stones originals not credited only to Mick Jagger and Keith Richards. According to Wood, the guitar riff was influenced by a Texas slide Blues guitarist named Hop Wilson, who recorded in the ’60s.-songfacts.com
First recorded in 1955, this version cracked Billboard’s Top 10. This song was originally written by Charlie Ryan. It was first recorded and released by Charlie Ryan and The Livingston Brothers in 1955. It tells the second half of the story started by the song Hot Rod Race, recorded in 1951 by Arkie Shibley and his Mountain Dew Boys, as referenced by the opening: “Have you heard this story of the Hot Rod Race, when Fords and Lincolns was settin’ the pace? That story is true, I’m here to say; I was drivin’ that Model A.” While the song tells of a race between a Lincoln and a Cadillac on the Grapevine grade in California, the actual location was on the Lewiston grade in Idaho.
The most iconic line from the song is: “Son, you’re gonna drive me to drinkin’ if you don’t stop drivin’ that Hot Rod Lincoln!”
Was there really a “hot-rod Lincoln?” Yes and no. Actually, it was a rebuilt car with the body of a Model “A” coupe set into the frame of a 1941 Lincoln, along with a “hopped-up” Lincoln engine block. However, at the time of this song’s writing, Ryan built a second car, this time with a chop-shop melding of a 1930 Model “A” Ford coupe and a wrecked 1948 Lincoln. It is this second restored car with which has Ryan toured.Both the songs “Hot Rod Lincoln” and “Hot Rod Race” are defining anthems of the hot rod community and 1950s car song culture. “Hot Rod Lincoln” has appeared in the soundtracks to The Beverley Hillbillies and MTV’s Beavis and Butthead.This was the only hit for Commander Cody and His Lost Planet Airmen, who were a County-Rock group formed at the University of Michigan. Commander Cody is lead singer and piano player George Frayne.-songfacts.com
The Cadillac Ranch is a collection of 10 Cadillacs buried hood-first in a wheat field near Amarillo, Texas. Visitors are allowed to add graffiti to the cars, which are considered works of art.
This is one of many early Springsteen songs featuring cars. Some others were “Thunder Road,” “Backstreets,” and “Racing In The Street.” Bruce used the Cadillac image again in 1984 on “Pink Cadillac.” Junior Johnson is mentioned in the second verse. He was a NASCAR racer in the ’50s and early ’60s before becoming a championship car owner. He won the second Daytona 500 in 1960 and was one of the first people to discover the drafting method of racing at the super speedways. Cars were very important growing up in New Jersey. Springsteen’s first car was a ’57 Chevy with orange flames painted on the hood.- songfacts.com
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WBER DJ David’s Electronic Playlist

August 15, 2012

This playlist features electronic, dance and techno music. Enjoy!

 

Derezzed/ Daft Punk

“The Game Has Changed” is the name of one of the tracks on Daft Punk’s score to Tron: Legacy, and it also fits Thomas Bangalter and Guy-Manuel de Homem-Christo’s  music for the film. When it was announced that the duo would score the sequel to one of sci-fi’s most visionary movies, it seemed like the perfect fit: Their sleek, neon-tipped, playful aesthetic springs from their love of late-‘70s and early-‘80s pop culture artifacts like Tron. However, Tron: Legacy takes a much darker, more serious approach than the original film and Daft Punk follows suit, delivering soaring and ominous pieces that sound more like modern classical music than any laser tag-meets-roller disco fantasies fans may have had. “Derezzed”’s filter-disco and “End of the Line,” evoke ‘80s video games. – All Music Guide

Moar ghosts n stuff/ Deadmau5

Born Joel Zimmerman on January 5, 1981, Deadmau5 rose to prominence when his track “Faxing Berlin” found its way onto the playlist of legendary DJ/producer Pete Tong’s radio show.  Deadmau5 soon became an important figure in the world of progressive house music, with his songs appearing on more than 15 compilation releases. A native of Toronto, Canada, he released his work through his own label, Mau5trap Recordings, and scored a number of awards in 2008, including a Juno Award for Dance Recording of the Year. He released Random Album Title that same year, along with the first volume of the remix-collecting At PLay series. The year 2009 saw the release of the singles collection It Sounds Like along with the mix album For Lack of a Better Name, while the studio album 4 X 4 + 12 followed in 2010. -All Music Guide

Das Spiegal/ The Chemical Brothers

The first half of the record, including the single “Do It Again” (unconsciously ironic title?), is no better nor worse than most of what The Chemical Brothers produced between 1998 and 2007, but beginning with a diverting little electro noodling called “Das Spiegel,” it becomes clear that there’s a little more going on here. Hip-hop’s favorite toker, Fatlip, stops by to relate an odd tale about fish (“The Salmon Dance”), “A Modern Midnight Conversation” dabbles in Italo-disco (but gets most of its flavor from a sample), and the duo stretch out (slightly) for the creepy four-four crawl “Battle Scars” with neo-folkie Willy Mason. The Chemical Brothers have occasionally shrouded their more interesting productions until the second half of their LPs, but something else is obviously needed.- All Music Guide

Drown in the now/ The Crystal Method

The Crystal Method have gradually shed the glossy big-beat techno that made their name in the late ’90s as one of the few mainstream American answers to the Chemical Brothers and Daft Punk, and they’ve also matured as producers, which has resulted in better albums (but fewer dancefloor-filling singles). They may still grab influences from the best in ’90s dance music, but they’ve become increasingly adept at constructing albums with more ideas (and subtlety) than the usual dance act. Matisyahu makes “Drown in the Now” moderately fresh, and the longtime L.A. man about town Justin Warfield attempts to channel Phil Oakey on the future shock “Kling to the Wreckage,” but these are yet more danceable electronica of the paint-by-numbers variety. – All Music Guide

Rez/Cowgirl/ Underworld

Underworld didn’t become one of the biggest groups in the dance world by sitting in the studio all day, spending as much time making tea as producing tracks. Between records, the trio toured incessantly — playing rock venues, dance floors, major festivals all over the world — and consistently made the single best case for techno working in a live (as opposed to club) context. And just like their studio LPs, this one works so well, not just because the tracks are so excellently produced, but because Underworld is so good at placing sympathetic tracks next to each other and creating effortless-sounding transitions. -All Music Guide

Omen/ The Prodigy

Twenty years after England’s Summer of Love, rave had made a comeback — at least in indie circles — and Liam Howlett’s Prodigy, the only original rave group still going, could hardly have done worse than jump aboard. But Invaders Must Die is a curious nu-rave record, as though the sound of 1991 (such as their Top Ten hit “Charly”) has been filtered through the sound of 1996 (such as their number one, “Firestarter”) to emerge as nothing more than a hodgepodge of uptempo dance music with extroverted beats and grimy bass lines. If that sounds basically like your average electronica record circa the turn of the millennium (albeit produced by one of its greatest heroes), then you’re a long way towards understanding what this nu-rave record from the Prodigy sounds like.- All Music Guide

Baptism/ Crystal Castles

Crystal Castles’ self-titled debut helped take 8-bit synth tones into the mainstream. That jagged, strangely naïve sound of old-school video games is so distinctive that it could easily define the duo’s music instead of vice versa, but Ethan Kath and Alice Glass avoid that trap on their second, also self-titled album. Though 8-bit synths aren’t as prominent here as they were on the band’s earlier work, Crystal Castles still love repurposing seemingly obsolete and unfashionable sounds: “Baptism”’s brassy blasts hark back to at least the early ‘90s. – All Music Guide

Bangarang/ Skrillex

Nominated for five Grammy Awards, shortlisted for the prestigious BBC Sound of 2012 poll, and courted by everyone from Chicago producer Kaskade to metal icons Korn, former From First to Last frontman Sonny Moore’s transition from post-hardcore vocalist to dubstep producer couldn’t have realistically gone any smoother. However, despite his unprecedented success, there’s still a question as to whether he can apply his now trademark, demonic, wobble bass drops and thumping syncopated beats to a whole album. Named after the battle cry of the lost boys in Steven Spielberg’s Hook, his fourth consecutive EP Bangarang (also his first Top 40 entry in both the U.K. and U.S.) suggests he’ll have to be on his game on the forthcoming full-length Voltage if he’s to avoid an Emperor’s New Clothes scenario.-All Music Guide

Ready Steady Go/ Paul Oakenfold

With a new partner, Andy Gray, Oakenfold shows often that he has the production gloss all taken care of, but track after track here tries, and fails, to capitalize on a familiar sound or a style, from stylish big-beat pastiche (“Ready Steady Go”) to robotic experimentalism à la Radiohead to evocative female singer/songwriter electronica.- All Music Guide

South Side/ Moby

Following a notorious flirtation with alternative rock, Moby returned to the electronic dance mainstream on the 1997 album I Like to Score. With 1999’s Play, he made yet another leap back toward the electronica base that had passed him by during the mid-’90s. The first two tracks, “Honey” and “Find My Baby,” weave short blues or gospel vocal samples around rather disinterested breakbeat techno. “South Side” is just another pop song by someone who shouldn’t be singing — that is, until the transcendent chorus redeems everything. Surprisingly, many of Moby’s vocal tracks are highlights; he has an unerring sense of how to frame his fragile vocals with sympathetic productions. -All Music Guide

Somnambulist/ BT

Emotional Technology is no great departure from the cinematic landscape of Brian Transeau’s excellent last album, the diverse Movement in Still Life. Keeping with that album’s attention to detail and seamless flow from track to track, Emotional Technology differs by being more ambitious, personal, and in the end a bit less satisfying. The electro-slap of Hybrid comes to mind on the Guru-guesting “Knowledge of Self,” the video game noises and solid rock & roll of “Superfabulous” is mega-uplifting, and “Somnambulist” almost equals “Never Gonna Come Back Down” for pop-trance perfection. -All Music Guide

 

Halcyon/ Orbital

Techno’s best albums act finally gets their very own singles collection, though the results fall just short of displaying the brilliance and grandeur of Orbital’s decade of great work. Fortunately, about 75 percent of Work 1989-2002 turns out exactly as it should: great versions of their best material, including their 1990 breakout “Chime” and the parade of excellent singles like “Halcyon and On and On,” “Lush,” “Belfast,” “Impact,” and “Are We Here?.” A few of these are present in drastically shortened 7″ versions, but that’s to be expected. Far, far worse is the focus on latter-day material like “Iluminate” and “Funny Break,” or the version on offer of the seminal “Satan” — instead of the 1990 original, the one here was taken from the Spawn soundtrack. – All Music Guide


LGBT Pride Month Playlist

June 25, 2012

A recent article in Billboard magazine entitled “Gay & R: Marketing, music and the LGBT community’s mainstream clout,” by Andrew Hampp talks about the buzz being created by bands and artists who play gigs at gay clubs and have impacted the culture. Here is a playlist of songs and artists to celebrate Pride month.

True Colors/ Cyndi Lauper

here were a few years in the mid-’80s when one couldn’t go out for a cup of coffee without encountering Cyndi Lauper in one form or another. Her videos were playing constantly on MTV, her music was everywhere on the radio, and, best of all, children were even dressing up as Cyndi for Halloween. In retrospect, it was a Lauper-ish time but it was all over quite quickly; in fact, the period in the ultra-limelight didn’t even span the period covered by two album releases, which means that this follow-up to her smash debut album was relegated to the also-ran pile, with sad results such as only one sort-of hit single (the title track) and nobody apparently interested in imitating the skirt she wore on the back cover photo, which seems like it is made of slashed-up concert posters. Kind of a shame since so much love and attention went into this album. -All Music Guide

We R Who We R/ Ke$ha

Ke$ha says she was inspired to write “We R Who We R” by news stories of a rash of suicides among gay youth. She told Rolling Stone, “I was really affected by the suicides that have been happening, having been subject to very public hatred [myself]. I have absolutely no idea how these kids felt. What I’m going through is nothing compared to what they had to go through. Just know things do get better and you need to celebrate who you are. Every weird thing about you is beautiful and makes life interesting. Hopefully the song really captures that emotion of celebrating who you are.” The song includes the lines “You know we’re superstars, we are who we are.”

All Time Low/ The Wanted

e first boy band to score a number one without the aid of reality TV since Blue in 2001, five-piece the Wanted have played a big part in resurrecting the previously dying genre. The fact that first single “All Time Low” didn’t receive huge X-Factor-style publicity, and was even snubbed by Radio 1, makes their success even more impressive. Their self-titled first album suggests that chart domination isn’t unlikely to end soon. With an eclectic sound taking in indie, rock, dance, and pop, the Wanted are truly a modern boy band. – All Music Guide

Born this way/ Lady Gaga

It was inevitable that Born This Way would be an escalation of The Fame,it was inevitable that Gaga would go where others feared to tread, it was inevitable that it would be bigger than any other record thrown down in 2011, both in its scale and success. This drumbeat, pulsating as insistently as Eurodisco, is so persistent that there is an inevitable feeling of anticlimax upon hearing Born This Wayfor the first time and realizing that Lady Gaga has channeled her grand ambitions into her message, and not her music. Gaga has taken it upon herself to filter out whatever personal details remain in her songs so she can write anthems for her Little Monsters, that ragtag group of queers, misfits, outcasts, and rough kids who she calls her own. – All Music Guide

Raise Your Glass/ P!nk

Released in 2010, Greatest Hits…So Far!!!rounds up the great majority of these hits, bypassing some singles — her debut “Most Girls” and “You Make Me Sick,” “God Is a DJ,” “Funhouse” and, most regrettably, “Feel Good Time,” her Beck/William Orbit-written entry for the Charlie’s Angels II: Full Throttle soundtrack — but hitting all the blockbusters (“There You Go,” “Just Like a Pill,” “Trouble,” “Stupid Girls,” “U + Ur Hand,” “So What,” “Please Don’t Leave Me”) while adding two new entries to her canon: the rabble-rousing “Raise Your Glass.” – All Music Guide

Trespassing/ Adam Lambert

The heart of Trespassinglies in the first two-thirds of the album, when Lambert is strutting like a glam-disco diva, sparring with Dr. Luke and Pharrell Williams, belting out his hooks with an easy confidence. And he’s got some great hooks here, too: big, bright, insistent hooks powering songs that revel in their sleaziness. Even if these songs never grace the charts, they sound like inevitable hits and prove that Lambert is a genuine pop star who has now left American Idol far behind. – All Music Guide

It Gets Better/ Fun.

Fun.’s debut album Aim and Ignite was an interesting blend of seemingly divergent styles topped by a healthy dose of grandiose ambition and performed with a precise abandon. The trio made an album that was truly progressive and also super catchy and fun. The follow-up, Some Nights, ramps up the ambition and sonic bombast, but also manages to be even more powerful and impressive. The album is overloaded with strings and horns, backing vocals, keyboards, and programmed drums surrounding Nate Ruess like a clamoring crowd, but never drowning out his innately sincere vocals and painfully honest lyrics. He has the kind of voice that could cut through any amount of noise, not by using volume but honesty. Even when he’s fed through Auto-Tune, you know he’s telling you the truth all the time.- All Music Guide

All the Lovers/ Kylie Minogue

By time of Kylie Minogue’s eleventh album, 2010’s Aphrodite,she had been releasing records for over 20 years. Most artists who’ve stuck around for that long end up rehashing their past catalogs and/or growing stale, but Kylie manages to avoid these fates by constantly working with new collaborators, keeping up on musical trends without pandering to them, and most importantly, never taking herself too seriously. The squiggly synths of the massively catchy “All the Lovers,” the sighing background vocals and spiraling harpsichord-esque synths on the ominous “Closer,” and the heavenly extended breakdown on “Looking for an Angel” are the kind of hooks that reward repeated listens.- All Muisc Guide

Take your Mama/ Scissor Sisters

The eponymous release is a gleaming composite of epic, unabashedly pretty ’70s songwriting and fancy-pants disco hedonism, reflecting the decadent dance-pop afterglow of all that George Michael wrought. This flirty, satiny sexuality tingles in every lyrical inch of Scissor Sisters, as the Sisters save their subtlety for the songcraft. Opener “Laura” is a swaggering, absolutely irresistible update of vintage Stevie Wonder, illustrated with piano breaks and a honking sax. “Take Your Mama” chirps in a high register, a honky chateau dreamland of the Beta Band covering Elton John. -All Music Guide

Sing it Loud/ K.D. Lang and the Siss Boom Bang

k.d. lang turned her back on the country-influenced music that first earned her fame with 1992’s Ingenue, and while she’s been making consistently fine albums since then, lang’s career has often seemed either eclectic or rudderless, depending on how you wish to look at it; she’s made a series of albums that have jumped from one stylistic vantage point to another, never settling in one place for long, and while they all feature her genuinely remarkable skills as a vocalist and often impressive songwriting, one rarely gets a sense of stylistic growth from her work since Ingenue, if only because she seems to be starting from scratch each time out, without building on what she’s done before.- All Music Guide


Reese’s High School Graduation Party Playlist- Part 1

May 31, 2012

Roosevelt Reese is not only one of Central Library’s best security staff, he also has his own Custom Entertainment and DJ Service, R & R Music. We’re helping Reese put together a playlist request for a high school graduation party. This mix is made up of R & B, rap and dance music.

Electric Slide

Cotton Eye Joe

C’mon n’ ride it (the train) / Quad City D.J.’s

Gasolina/ Daddy Yankee

Glamorous/ Fergie

Baby (feat. Ludacris)/ Justin Bieber

 I want you back & ABC/ Jackson Five

P.Y.T. (pretty young thing)/ Michael Jackson

OMG (feat. Will.i.am)/ Usher

Headlines/ Drake

Dynomite (going postal)/ Rhymefest

Pon de replay/Rihanna

Your love is my drug/ Ke$ha

Starships/ Nicki Minaj

I got you (I feel good)/ James Brown

Just fine/ Mary J. Blige